Featured: Don Hudson – New Archives


photographs ©Don Hudson

When I first contacted Don about his work I inquired about his archives.  He’d posted a few older photographs that caught my interest and I was curious about the rest.  What ensued from there was the beginning of a back and forth conversation about photography, life and how to balance the two.

Don had plenty of photographic ambition in his youth.  He went to art school, built a darkroom and commenced pursuing his passion. But then a series of events forced some inner reflection, and he realized that he wasn’t interested in earning a living from photography. It wasn’t for him, so he changed gears, got a regular job, married and raised a family.

It was also around this time that he met a mentor who lead him down the path of ‘straight photography.’  This was his “ah ha” moment, and he’s been on that path ever since.  Through my conversations with Don, it became apparent that one important element of photography for him is the camaraderie with other photographers.  The chatter and discussions about ideas, and the mysteries of photography.

And when he found the web, he found a new form of camaraderie which has re-invigorated his photography.  He moved to digital and hasn’t missed a beat.  I’m still curious about the archives, and Don has told me that he’ll slowly share more over time, as well as sharing his new work, the two seemingly flowing into each other, creating a singular archive.

Maybe this is all we’re really doing with our work, building archives in the hope that some photographer in the future will catch a glimpse, become curious and send off an email which will launch a new connection.

We’ve put together a slideshow that covers Don’s work over the years, which begins with a couple photographs from his parents archive.  You can also view more of Don’s work on Flickr.

View Slideshow

(Sponsor alert: LPV slideshows are powered by Viewbook)

  • http://johngoldsmithphotography.com/ John Goldsmith

    Having grown up in Detroit, whenever I see Hudson’s newly published pictures, I feel as is I’m viewing one of my own childhood memories. It’s an eerie feeling but one I look forward to. I sometimes get into the mindset that I might even recognize my own family or myself in Hudson’s deep archives of Detroit photographic history. While that hasn’t happened yet, I’m glad that someone has and continues to document Motown from the perspective of people rather than ruins. That’s how I remember the city. I think most people from there would agree. Or, at a minimum, how they would prefer to reminisce.Regardless, Hudson’s work is amazing and I hope I can get back to Detroit to finally meet him.

  • http://www.systermans.com alex cretey-systermans

    Thanks Bryan for this feature. It was a very nice surprise this morning. Don is such an excellent photographer and one of the nicest guys I ‘ve ever communicated with on the internet, the one person I wish I could meet face to face one day.

  • http://waxyphotography.com John Goldsmith

    Wonderful. It’s a great selection. Don’s framing includes just the right amount of story to the photos: enough detail and mystery but without too much abstraction or open-endedness. Plus, being from of Michigan, I feel as though I’m seeing some of my own childhood in a distant sort of way.

  • Don Hudson

    Bryan, thanks so much for the feature and the interest you’ve shown in my work.